Clinton Releases 2015 Tax Returns; Paid 34% Effective Federal Rate

Hillary Clinton and her husband, former President Bill Clinton, paid an effective federal income tax rate of 34% in 2015 and donated nearly 10% of their gross income to charity, the campaign said. ENLARGE
Hillary Clinton and her husband, former President Bill Clinton, paid an effective federal income tax rate of 34% in 2015 and donated nearly 10% of their gross income to charity, the campaign said. Photo: chris keane/Reuters

Hillary Clinton released her 2015 personal tax return on Friday, further pressuring Republican opponent Donald Trump, who has spurned a decades-old tradition by refusing to release any of his returns.

Mrs. Clinton and her husband, former President Bill Clinton, paid an effective federal tax rate of 34% in 2015 on $ 10.6 million in adjusted gross income. Their income was down sharply from $ 28 million in 2014, when they paid an effective tax rate of more than 35%.

The latest return, 40 pages long, showed the Clintons donated nearly 10% of their adjusted gross income to charity.

Mrs. Clinton’s running mate, Sen. Tim Kaine (D., Va.), and his wife, Anne Holton, released 10 years of his returns on Friday. They paid an effective rate of 20% last year on $ 313,000 in income. Their rate ranged from as low as 13% in 2009, Mr. Kaine’s last full year as governor of Virginia, to 24% in 2011. They donated 7.5% of their adjusted gross income to charity over the last 10 years.

Democrats have hammered Mr. Trump over his refusal to release his returns. He has said he won’t do so until an audit has been completed, and he could become the first major-party presidential candidate since 1976 to release no returns.

“He refuses to do what every other presidential candidate in decades has done and release his tax returns,” Mrs. Clinton said Thursday.

No law stops Mr. Trump from releasing returns during an audit, but tax lawyers say public scrutiny of the returns could give the Internal Revenue Service new leads.

Mrs. Clinton had previously posted online her returns back to 2007. She and her husband have released returns dating to 1977.

Democrats—and some Republicans—have suggested a range of reasons why Mr. Trump hasn’t released the records: that he isn’t as rich as he suggests, which could undercut a central argument of his candidacy; that he pays very little in federal taxes; and that he doesn’t give much money to charity.

The Clinton campaign released a video Friday highlighting Republicans making some of those points—including an old video of Mr. Trump arguing that presidential candidates need to release their returns.

The tax disclosure also highlights some uncomfortable points for Mrs. Clinton, including many high-price speeches she has given since leaving the State Department in 2013. For example, Mrs. Clinton collected $ 1.5 million for six speeches, including three delivered in Canada, in 2015 before she officially launched her campaign.

Write to Nick Timiraos at [email protected]


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